Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence

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Sheryl F. Means, Ph.D has created 3 entries

Sheryl F. Means, Ph.D

  • The Need to Achieve by Grade Three

    THE IMPORTANCE OF 3RD GRADE PROFICIENCY FOR STUDENT SUCCESS
    Research demonstrates how foundational 3rd grade reading and math proficiency is to students’ future success, including completing high school on time.  Particularly with reading, after 3rd grade, students need to read to learn, not just learn to read.
    We know in Kentucky that more must be done to…

  • An Absent-Minded Quest

    I’ve been feeling somewhat like an adventurer on an epic quest in search of the answer to a question that, in my mind, should be fairly simple: What is chronic absenteeism? As part of the new accountability standards, I assumed that a functioning definition for the term MUST exist somewhere in the vast catalogues of information we now access on the Internet. After all, it was defined and utilized within the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and as part of the Office of Education Accountability (OEA) report. Yet, the more I asked, the more the answer changed. Surely, the definition must be somewhere. Yet, as part of my journey, slaying the dragons of red tape and being the new “guy”, I was informed - much to this researcher’s chagrin - that a singular definition of chronic absenteeism does not exist. Though the many permutations of the discussion are similar, there are nuances. On my quest, I came across these similar (yet different) definitions: Chronic absenteeism is typically defined as missing 10 percent or more of a school year -- approximately 18 days a year, or just two days every month. (Obrien, 2013) Students who are chronically absent—meaning they miss at least 15 days of school in a year—are at serious risk of falling behind in school. (U.S. Department of Education) Chronic absenteeism measures attendance in a different way, combining excused, unexcused and disciplinary absences to get a complete picture of how much instructional time students are missing. (Jordan, Miller, 2017) The criteria for chronic absenteeism varies, but generally students who miss 10 or more days of school or 10% or greater of the school year are considered chronically absent. (Carter, 2018) Chronic absenteeism—or missing 10 percent or more of school days for any reason—is a proven early warning sign of academic risk and school dropout. (Bruner, Discher, Chang, 2011) And of course, I asked Merriam-Webster: 1: prolonged absence of an owner from his or her property 2: chronic absence (as from work or school); also: the rate of such absence.