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A Big Bold Future for Kentucky

By Susan Perkins Weston | December 8, 2022

In 2020, the Prichard Committee urged all Kentuckians to join the work of creating a Big Bold Future for our Commonwealth. To frame that work, we identified twelve indicators. Together, these data points let us:

  • Compare our work to other states
  • Analyze trends over the years
  • See results for Kentuckians of varied backgrounds and ages
  • Find cause for celebration
  • Recognize areas of concern

In 2022, returning to those indicators, we see some bright spots.

Bluntly, we also see shadows. Many indicators warrant our concern. Our effort to build a Big Bold Future are struggling.

Our 2022 reporting confirms the need for renewed and expanded efforts.

Let’s look at the data and then consider how to engage the challenges.

Saturday, September 24th was an agenda filled day for Hispanic families in Northern Kentucky as they attended the 2nd Annual Hispanic Families Leadership Conference hosted by Learning Grove. Learning Grove Hispanic Family Engagement Coordinator, Theresa Cruz, led the day long event with support from parent leaders, community members and sponsors.

The start of school has been making a wave across Kentucky, with students returning in early August and others who are returning this week. After several years of uncertainty, this beginning seems reminiscent of the pre-covid back to school frenzy.

The Connections Newsletter-Welcome Back Edition, hit inboxes in early August, as mailed letters also made their way to each Superintendent in Kentucky public schools

The start of school has been making a wave across Kentucky, with students returning in early August and others who are returning this week. After several years of uncertainty, this beginning seems reminiscent of the pre-covid back to school frenzy.

The Connections Newsletter-Welcome Back Edition, hit inboxes in early August, as mailed letters also made their way to each Superintendent in Kentucky public schools

As schools are starting to open and, across the nation, we are hearing resounding concern about teacher shortages, there is no more important time to celebrate the work Kentucky teachers do – day in and day out. When it comes to what our schools can do to prepare each and every learner for a bright future, research confirms that teaching matters most. Yet so many stories of the impact a teacher has in his or her classroom are overshadowed by the shear busyness of our lives and the extraordinarily tense public-political world we find ourselves in.

With the passage of 2022’s House Bill 9, Kentucky has moved a step closer to having some public charter schools. That step invites many different questions about policy, impact, evidence, principles, and practicalities. Today, we’re releasing a series of posts by Susan Perkins Weston, each aimed at one major question we’ve heard recently and also over the years since the Prichard Committee’s “Exploring Charter Schools in Kentucky: An Informational Guide” came out in November 2015.