Lonnie Harp, Author at Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence
Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence

Lonnie Harp

  • SENIORS EXPECT A NEW LANDSCAPE OF CHALLENGES, CHANGE

    Over the past year, the Class of 2021 experienced stinging sacrifices, potentially life-changing insights and a range of hardships and new options they describe as certain to shape their entry into the adult world. As glimmers emerge promising a return to normal school operations after a year of remote learning, high school seniors look ahead with a new mindset of bracing for change and adaptation.
  • Partnership between City of Covington and its schools brings laptops and wifi to students

    The City of Covington worked throughout 2020 to provide devices and connections for students in the Covington Independent School District. When the pandemic hit, nearly 60 percent of families lacked regular internet access. The city government moved quickly to budget $2.5 million from federal pandemic aid to expand internet access across Covington and initiate partnerships…

  • NURTURING HIGH-QUALITY, HOME-BASED CHILD CARE

    For Kelsey Lee of Morgantown, locking in quality child care was such a priority that she put her name on a top local provider’s waiting list while she was pregnant. More than five years later, she said that decision has helped her son be more than ready to thrive in kindergarten next year and in the school years ahead.
  • ACADEMIC GAINS CONTINUE AS SCHOOL GOES REMOTE

    In May, the final learning triumphs of a topsy-turvy school year occurred at converted breakfast tables, in living rooms, or bedroom corners across the state. The spring of 2020 showed how a hurried push to provide remote learning and continued connection provided students and teachers ways to connect, network and move learning forward.
  • CRISIS EXPANDS DEFINITION OF SCHOOL WORK

    APRIL 2020 \\\\\ SCHOOL SUPPORT STAFF For more than 100 high school students in Graves County, thinking about the effects of coronavirus arrived months before prevention measures transformed students’ lives and left school staffs and communities scrambling to meet the needs of suddenly isolated students and families. Kentucky’s aggressive response to limiting the virus’s spread upended student and family life. In addition to new modes of teaching and learning, the crisis has also jolted adults who support schools into new directions and prompted community responses to supplement student learning and promote families’ welfare.
  • MAKING PROFICIENCY A DISTRICT CONSTANT

    FEBRUARY 2020 \\\\\ MONROE COUNTY A clear handle on fractions is the goal for fourth-grade math students one January morning at Gamaliel Elementary, a small school perched near the Tennessee border in Monroe County. Teacher Shelly Buck asks her students to concentrate and visualize: “Make up one-fourth in your head,” she says. “If you were to visually picture one-fourth, is it more or less than one half?” She asks students to think and be prepared to take a position or to agree or disagree with classmates ...
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